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president joe biden accurately calling obama's health-care the big frigging deal i suggested -- we are on c-span -- i suggested to his chief of staff the stimulus was just as big, bigger. we probably did more in that bill than the clinton administration did in eight years one adviser told me. critics often argue that the new deal left behind iconic monuments, the hoover dam, skyline drive, fort knox, the stimulus will leave a legacy of sewage plants, repaved pot holes and state employees who would have been laid off without it. even if recovery act architect feels -- fear that like winston churchill -- in reality it is creating its own icons. the world's largest wind farm. half a dozen of the largest solar farms, 0 energy border stations, state of the are battery factories, eco friendly coast guard headquarters on washington hillside. it is restoring old icons like the brooklyn bridge and the bay bridge. the beloved everglades. seattle's pike place market and the staten island ferry terminal. but its main legacy like the new deal will be changed. that is also the main theme. it is not a new
and then started in the kings island because they were falling and they won several more victories with joe and actually insisting on being a warrior and a leader making major decisions that could have gotten her in trouble it was a frontier town and her home and it's got about 160 inhabitants. it was ont
for the first two years. joe martin was speaker of the house and he had a very difficult time dealing with republicans on capitol hill. the democrats took over in the election of 1954. >> sam rayburn became speaker can and lyndon johnson was majority leader. eisenhower got along marvelously with rayburn johnson. eisenhower have did to be born in the district which it heard. they thought alike and they put the national interest first. they were aware of the party interest as well and almost all of the legislation in the eisenhower period period stems from a time when it was a democratic congress. it was a different time in that respect and that differ slightly from the answer to the first question as to where eisenhower would be today. back in 1952, running for the republican nomination, seems to me and eisenhower defeated the republican party of today. >> on that note -- the. [laughter] [applause] >> see would be defeated in the republican party of today. [applause] >> it would like to thank our distinguished panelists and it's been an honor to have the three of them here. i urge you
landlord you speak in abstractions. his name was joe shuster he lived in massachusetts and the same town where i grew up. they refused to make repairs they got these buildings from hud. the housing and urban development and the plumbing did not work so they would raise the tiles of the basement floor. pineapple would never let me use the elevator one of her schoolmates died he lived on the fourth floor and the elevator door suddenly open end wide-open and he stepped forward automatically end fell for flights to his death and his body was not found until his blood began to drip on passengers. then the basement cafeteria than been a horror story how could i duplicate this? it smelled like a free the -- feeding trough for cattle. i would have to eat there with her. you have to see and smell will we do to children. i don't know how you feel but aesthetics count a lot in the mentality of children. beautiful settings refined their souls. ugly settings course and their mentalities. this is how they value what we perceived of them. the sharpest way to draw the line across the races of this natio
thurmond i name is joe crespino and i would be happy to help you get to your next flight. he said are you sure you have enough time? i want to delay you. i said no sir, have plenty of time. so i picked up his bag and we walked together for about 10 minutes. i was just trying to make conversation with strom thurmond so i told him about all the people i had met that summer and he said nice things about the various colleagues that i had met in that kind of thing. i told them i was on my way -- ahead a girlfriend from florence south carolina and i said some silly comment about south carolina girls, i guess because it was the kind of smalltalk one made with strom thurmond. i got into his flight hanushek his hand again and that was it. but i thought about that story a lot as i have written this book because the story really is a metaphor for the difficulty i had in writing about or the challenge that i faced in writing about this very controversial figure. you know there is no easy or straightforward way to write about a figure as controversial as strom thurmond. sometimes in reading this book
-policy experience. she said really the thing that made a difference in joe biden versus her wasn't foreign-policy experience and she agreed those essential appears to shoot several strikes start, but she's been a very good cabinet secretary. and who knows what that may take her 2016. >> okay. part or i suspect i know who will take the lead him out of nancy kassebaum. >> we put me in the end for several reasons. one, the first woman elected to the senate in her own right. there was an article about what the science article written about 30 or 35 years ago about the women in congress and the title was over his dead body. and there's still quite a few women in congress who got their because their husbands die. some of the first women, she followed her husband who had died when the policy and then took that over. and so, kassebaum was the first one who would never followed the south. and now once again gave her a lot of tension. it is a very highly visible rays, covered even one of the london newspapers commented it the day after the election. q. we have one woman in the senate. if you're one
, employment, home. so if anybody else makes any one of those criteria can for example come his son joe hill no longer lives in the state of maine, we collecting. we've been collecting books since 1836 year the library. we have a number of unique or very rare items. for instance, we have a copy of the first edition of the book of mormon, which has been in the state library since approximately 1848, was published in 1830. the first run was 5000 copies and in institutions there were fewer than 10% of that left. what makes our copy a little bit different is if you can do the maine state library, will pull it out of the state do much to at it. with gloves. because that connection to sacred literature is so important to so many people, that we think that is something valuable we can do. we believe in preserving books. but there's no point in preserving them without access. so that is something we do with that of the differently than other libraries. there is one item that we do not let anybody actually touch. and that is the martha ballard diaries. martha ballard was a midwife lived in hollow man
and when i talked to her she said the thing that made the difference in joe biden versus her was foreign policy experience and she agreed that was the essential. she had several strikes against her but she was a good cabinet secretary. who knows where that might take her in 2016. >> and our third is senator nancy katzenbaum. >> she was the first woman elected to the senate in her own right. there was a political science article written 35 years ago about women in congress and the title was over his dead body and still quite a few women in congress -- some of the first women like margaret smith who was in the senate, she followed her husband who took that over, so she was the first two had never followed staff and that once again gave her a lot of attention and was a very highly visible race that was covered, even the london newspaper commented on it after the elections so here we have one woman in the senate, if you are 1-woman you get a lot of attention. two years after she was elected she was one of the temporary shares of the republican convention. people were already touting her as a
, employment, home, anybody else meets one of the criteria, his son, joe hills no longer lives? the state of maine. we claim him. we have been collected books since 1836. we have a number of unique or rare items. for instance we have a copy of the first edition of the book of mormon. which has been in the state library since approximately 1848. it was published in 1830. the first one was 5,000 copies. they were only in institutions there are fewer than 10% of that left. that makes our copy a little bit different. if you don't maine state library. we would full out of the safe and let you look at it with gloves. because that connection to literature is important so many people. that we think it's something valuable we can do. we believe in preserving books, but there's no point in preserving them without access. so that's something we do a little bit differently than other libraries. there is one item that we do not let anybody actually touch. and that's the martha ballard dares. martha ballard was a midwife who lived in maine, the next town down the river from 1785 to 1812. she kept a han
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9